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Oklahoma growers produce a diverse number of row crops that are important to the economy of Oklahoma, worth more than $390 million in 2008. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is a sustainable approach to manage pests that combines prevention, avoidance, pest monitoring, and suppression in a manner that minimizes health, economic, and environmental risk. OSU continues to work to develop and deliver IPM programs for row crop production systems in Oklahoma.

 

 

Canola & Sunflower

Canola and sunflower are grown as alternative or rotational crops for winter wheat. They are processed for oil that can be used as a food source, or as a potential source of biodisel. Canola is considered a new crop but producers are becoming more interested in growing it every year, and production has expanded from less than 5,000 acres to nearly 200,000 acres over the past 10 years. As production increases, there will be even more need for IPM programs to manage the pests that are associated with this crop.Canola and sunflower are grown as alternative or rotational crops for winter wheat. They are processed for oil that can be used as a food source, or as a potential source of biodisel. Canola is considered a new crop but producers are becoming more interested in growing it every year, and production has expanded from less than 5,000 acres to nearly 200,000 acres over the past 10 years. As production increases, there will be even more need for IPM programs to manage the pests that are associated with this crop.

 

Newsletters & Blogs

Fact Sheets

Sunflower Fact Sheets

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Corn & Sorghum

Corn and sorghum are important crops for Oklahoma producers. More than 350 thousand acres of corn and 340 thousand acres of sorghum were grown in 2008. Most of the corn and sorghum grown in Oklahoma is used to feed cattle and other livestock. Corn production practices have changed dramatically with the development and adoption of transgenic varieties that contain genetics for weed and insect control and the need to grow corn with less water. So far, sorghum variety development has not followed the transgenic trend, but new varieties are available that offer competitively high yields and make a good choice for a summer cash crop. Today, new pest management challenges await corn and sorghum producers, but fortunately IPM programs are flexible enough to meet those challenges.

 

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Fact Sheets

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Cotton

Cotton is an important cash crop for Oklahoma producers. Most of Oklahoma's cotton is grown in the southwestern part of the state, although cotton can be grown as far north as Kay County, bordering Kansas. IPM programs have historically been important for the economical production of cotton, due to boll weevil and the bollworm/budworm complex. Cotton production practices have changed dramatically with the the eradication of boll weevil from Oklahoma through the Oklahoma boll weevil eradication program and with the development and adoption of transgenic cottons that contain  technologies for weed and insect control. Today, new pest management challenges await cotton producers, but fortunately IPM programs are flexible enough to meet those challenges.

 

Newsletters & Blogs

  • Cotton Comments (Newsletter)
  • Down and Dirty with NPK (OSU Soil Fertility Blog)
  • Everything but Wheat (OSU Cropping Systems Blog)

Fact Sheets

Other Resources


Peanut

Peanut production in Oklahoma started in the 1930s and early 1940s in response to the need for oil during World War II. In 1940, there were 82,000 acres of peanuts planted. The high mark for plantings came seven years later when Oklahoma farmers planted 325,000 acres of peanuts. Today peanuts are grown on approximately 22,000 acres in more than 12 of the state’s 77 counties. While relatively small in acreage, peanuts are an important crop in Oklahoma's agricultural economy, worth about $19 million. Peanut producers are faced with many pest challenges, but fortunately, IPM programs are flexible enough to meet those challenges.

 

Fact Sheets

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Soybean

Soybean is an important cash crop for Oklahoma producers. Oklahoma producers grow an average of 350,000 acres of soybean each year. Soybean production practices have changed dramatically with the development and adoption of transgenic varieties that contain genetics for weed control. Soybean producers are facing new challenges from exotic pests that have been introduced into the US in recent years, including soybean rust and soybean aphid. Fortunately IPM programs are flexible enough to meet those challenges. 

 

Newsletters & Blogs

Fact Sheets

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